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How often can you update your will?

On Behalf of | Dec 11, 2020 | Estate Planning And Probate

When you write your will in Minnesota, it might be tempting to think that you can sit back and never worry about your assets again. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. If you want your will to be accurate when you die, you’ll need to revise it multiple times throughout your lifetime. Luckily, there’s no limit to the number of times you can change your will. Changing your will isn’t just permitted: It’s actively encouraged.

How frequently can you change your will?

As far as estate planning and probate goes, you can change your will as many times as you need during your lifetime. Depending on the life events that you experience, you might make multiple changes through the years.

For example, if you file for divorce, you’ll likely want to change your will and update the beneficiaries on your accounts so that your former spouse won’t get any of your assets when you die. Additionally, if you have a child, you’ll want to rewrite your will to include them as a beneficiary. You’ll probably also update your will if you have a falling out with a friend or a family member who was supposed to receive some of your assets.

You’ll also need to update your will if something happens to the executor whom you named. You might want to name an executor and a back-up executor so that someone will always be around to take charge and distribute your assets after your death.

How legal assistance to help you write your will

Unfortunately, writing a will isn’t as easy as naming a few beneficiaries and calling it a day. An attorney may help you navigate the complexities of the process and offer guidance so that you avoid making mistakes that could cause issues for your loved ones after your death.